At least 108 civilians have been killed in Tigray airstrikes this month, according to the UNA. At least 108 civilians have been murdered in Tigray airstrikes this month, according to the United Nations.

Since New Year’s Day, at least 108 civilians have been murdered in a series of airstrikes in Ethiopia’s war-torn northern Tigray area, according to the UN.

The UN also warned that a humanitarian calamity was approaching in the region, with its food delivery operations on the edge of collapsing.

“My appeal to the parties: halt the fighting in all its manifestations,” UN Secretary General Antonio Guterres stated on Twitter. All those in need of humanitarian assistance must get it as soon as feasible. It’s past time to start talking and reconciling.”

The UN human rights office has urged Ethiopian authorities to provide civilian safety, warning that disproportionate assaults on non-military targets could amount to war crimes.

Since November 2020, when Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed dispatched troops to Tigray after accusing the region’s ruling party, the Tigray People’s Liberation Front (TPLF), of attacks on federal army facilities, northern Ethiopia has been wracked by war.

“We are disturbed by the numerous, extremely alarming allegations we continue to hear of civilian casualties and destruction of civilian items as a result of airstrikes in Ethiopia’s Tigray region,” said Liz Throssell, a spokesperson for the UN Human Rights Office, in Geneva.
“Air attacks allegedly carried out by the Ethiopian air force have reportedly killed at least 108 civilians and injured 75 others since the year began.”

She described a series of airstrikes, including one on the Dedebit camp for internally displaced people on January 7, which left at least 56 people dead and 30 others wounded, three of whom eventually died in hospital.

On Monday, an airstrike attacked a grain mill, killing 17 civilians and injuring 21, and on Tuesday, an airstrike hit the state-owned Technical Vocational Education and Training facility, killing three individuals, according to Throssell.
She went on to say that there had been a slew of other airstrikes reported in the previous week.

“We call on Ethiopian authorities and their partners to protect individuals and civilian objects in accordance with their international commitments,” Throssell added.

“By failing to adhere to the rules of distinction and proportionality, war crimes may be committed.”
Meanwhile, the UN’s World Food Programme claimed its deliveries were at an all-time low, with no WFP convoys reaching the Tigrayan capital Mekele since mid-December due to the escalation of the fighting.

WFP spokesman Tomson Phiri told reporters that “life-saving food assistance activities in northern Ethiopia are set to grind to a halt due to severe fighting in the neighborhood that has impeded the movement of fuel and food.”
“Following a 14-month battle in northern Ethiopia, more people than ever require immediate food help.
“We are on the verge of a catastrophic humanitarian calamity due to a lack of food, gasoline, and access.”

Since New Year’s Day, at least 108 civilians have been murdered in a series of airstrikes in Ethiopia’s war-torn northern Tigray area, according to the UN.

The UN also warned that a humanitarian calamity was approaching in the region, with its food delivery operations on the edge of collapsing.

“My appeal to the parties: halt the fighting in all its manifestations,” UN Secretary General Antonio Guterres stated on Twitter. All those in need of humanitarian assistance must get it as soon as feasible. It’s past time to start talking and reconciling.”

The UN human rights office has urged Ethiopian authorities to provide civilian safety, warning that disproportionate assaults on non-military targets could amount to war crimes.

Since November 2020, when Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed dispatched troops to Tigray after accusing the region’s ruling party, the Tigray People’s Liberation Front (TPLF), of attacks on federal army facilities, northern Ethiopia has been wracked by war.

“We are disturbed by the numerous, extremely alarming allegations we continue to hear of civilian casualties and destruction of civilian items as a result of airstrikes in Ethiopia’s Tigray region,” said Liz Throssell, a spokesperson for the UN Human Rights Office, in Geneva.
“Air attacks allegedly carried out by the Ethiopian air force have reportedly killed at least 108 civilians and injured 75 others since the year began.”

She described a series of airstrikes, including one on the Dedebit camp for internally displaced people on January 7, which left at least 56 people dead and 30 others wounded, three of whom eventually died in hospital.

On Monday, an airstrike attacked a grain mill, killing 17 civilians and injuring 21, and on Tuesday, an airstrike hit the state-owned Technical Vocational Education and Training facility, killing three individuals, according to Throssell.
She went on to say that there had been a slew of other airstrikes reported in the previous week.

“We call on Ethiopian authorities and their partners to protect individuals and civilian objects in accordance with their international commitments,” Throssell added.

“By failing to adhere to the rules of distinction and proportionality, war crimes may be committed.”
Meanwhile, the UN’s World Food Programme claimed its deliveries were at an all-time low, with no WFP convoys reaching the Tigrayan capital Mekele since mid-December due to the escalation of the fighting.

WFP spokesman Tomson Phiri told reporters that “life-saving food assistance activities in northern Ethiopia are set to grind to a halt due to severe fighting in the neighborhood that has impeded the movement of fuel and food.”
“Following a 14-month battle in northern Ethiopia, more people than ever require immediate food help.
“We are on the verge of a catastrophic humanitarian calamity due to a lack of food, gasoline, and access.”
At least 108 civilians have been killed in Tigray airstrikes this month: UN

Since New Year’s Day, at least 108 civilians have been murdered in a series of airstrikes in Ethiopia’s war-torn northern Tigray area, according to the UN.

The UN also warned that a humanitarian calamity was approaching in the region, with its food delivery operations on the edge of collapsing.

“My appeal to the parties: halt the fighting in all its manifestations,” UN Secretary General Antonio Guterres stated on Twitter. All those in need of humanitarian assistance must get it as soon as feasible. It’s past time to start talking and reconciling.”

The UN human rights office has urged Ethiopian authorities to provide civilian safety, warning that disproportionate assaults on non-military targets could amount to war crimes.

Since November 2020, when Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed dispatched troops to Tigray after accusing the region’s ruling party, the Tigray People’s Liberation Front (TPLF), of attacks on federal army facilities, northern Ethiopia has been wracked by war.

“We are disturbed by the numerous, extremely alarming allegations we continue to hear of civilian casualties and destruction of civilian items as a result of airstrikes in Ethiopia’s Tigray region,” said Liz Throssell, a spokesperson for the UN Human Rights Office, in Geneva.
“Air attacks allegedly carried out by the Ethiopian air force have reportedly killed at least 108 civilians and injured 75 others since the year began.”

She described a series of airstrikes, including one on the Dedebit camp for internally displaced people on January 7, which left at least 56 people dead and 30 others wounded, three of whom eventually died in hospital.

On Monday, an airstrike attacked a grain mill, killing 17 civilians and injuring 21, and on Tuesday, an airstrike hit the state-owned Technical Vocational Education and Training facility, killing three individuals, according to Throssell.
She went on to say that there had been a slew of other airstrikes reported in the previous week.

“We call on Ethiopian authorities and their partners to protect individuals and civilian objects in accordance with their international commitments,” Throssell added.

“By failing to adhere to the rules of distinction and proportionality, war crimes may be committed.”
Meanwhile, the UN’s World Food Programme claimed its deliveries were at an all-time low, with no WFP convoys reaching the Tigrayan capital Mekele since mid-December due to the escalation of the fighting.

WFP spokesman Tomson Phiri told reporters that “life-saving food assistance activities in northern Ethiopia are set to grind to a halt due to severe fighting in the neighborhood that has impeded the movement of fuel and food.”
“Following a 14-month battle in northern Ethiopia, more people than ever require immediate food help.
“We are on the verge of a catastrophic humanitarian calamity due to a lack of food, gasoline, and access.”

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