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LONDON – Two doctors working for the United Kingdom’s National Health Service said they missed the last aircraft out of Khartoum on Saturday because it was too hazardous to fly, accusing the UK of failing to provide adequate support.

Mustafa Abbas, a 44-year-old Sudanese Irish doctor, and his 38-year-old Sudanese British wife Sarra Eljak are currently in Wad Madani, 220 kilometers south of the city, with their four children: Danya, 12, Menna, 11, Anne, 7, and Mohammed, six months. They are more than 800 kilometers from Port Sudan, where they hope to catch a ship to Saudi Arabia.

“It’s extremely dangerous to get to the evacuation site (in Khartoum), and the area is still under attack,” Eljak told PA Media.

“I can’t put my children in this situation.” People with families should be taken into account by the UK government. I don’t want to endanger my children’s lives. “It appears that we have been abandoned.”

Eljak, from Slough in southeast England, expressed concern about the “very long journey” with her small children to Port Sudan.

“I arrived with my six-month-old premature baby.” He requires a certain sort of formula milk, which I am currently out of. There is a malaria pandemic in the area where I am currently staying.”

“It’s really difficult as a father,” Abbas remarked. Every minute of every day, (the youngsters) ask when we’re leaving. They say, ‘we are homesick, we miss our pals,’ and it’s impossible to respond.

“The major countries are simply allowing their militaries and militias to fight and kill innocent people.” At the end of the day, we are all human, and we should take care of one another.”

The couple and their children were in Sudan to spend Ramadan with family in Khartoum. They were to go on April 24 after Eid Al-Fitr.

Fighting broke out between the Sudanese Armed Forces and the paramilitary Rapid Support Forces on April 15, forcing the family to evacuate to Wad Madani.

“All of a sudden, we just woke up hearing shooting guns and military helicopters everywhere,” Eljak explained to the Guardian. “Our front door was shot at, and the bullets were discovered inside the house.” You always have the feeling that one of your family members is going to die.”

Eljak expressed concern about the impact the incident was having on her family.

“They (the children) scream when they hear the bang of a closing door.” They all had different panic episodes. Danya, my oldest daughter, refused to eat or drink for four days.

“Every one of my children has said that if they arrive in the UK safely, they will never return to Sudan.” This brings a tear to my eye.”

 

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