According to a war monitor and pro-regime media, Syrian terrorists killed ten soldiers in northern Syria on Friday, the bloodiest such strike since a truce agreement was established over two years ago.

According to Syria’s official news agency SANA, which cited a military source, nine soldiers were also injured in the incident.

“Around 9:30 this morning, terrorists targeted an army bus” in Aleppo province’s west, according to SANA, citing a source.
The Syrian Observatory for Human Rights stated earlier on Friday that the attack killed “pro-regime fighters.”

The monitor said it was unclear whether the attack was carried out by Hayat Tahrir Al-Sham, the area’s major extremist group, or other rebel groups.
According to Observatory head Rami Abdel Rahman, the assailants fired an anti-tank guided missile into a bus conveying pro-regime fighters back to their communities.

The death toll in pro-regime troops from an opposition strike on Friday was the highest reported since a peace agreement struck by Russia and Turkey in March 2020.

Six rebel fighters were murdered this month in similar strikes by regime military or allied militia, according to him.

The death toll in pro-regime troops from an opposition strike on Friday was the highest reported since a peace agreement struck by Russia and Turkey in March 2020.

President Bashar Assad’s regime held only a fifth of Syria’s land before Russia joined in the conflict.

Damascus reclaimed much of the area it had lost in the early phases of the conflict, which began in 2011 when the regime violently suppressed pro-democracy protesters.

Large swaths of Idlib province, as well as parts of nearby Aleppo, Hama, and Latakia provinces, are part of the last pocket of armed opposition to the regime.

HTS, which is led by ex-members of Syria’s previous Al-Qaeda affiliate, is the most powerful force in the area, although other rebel factions with varied degrees of Turkish support are also active.

Despite periodic attacks by both sides, including continuous Russian air strikes, the 2020 peace agreement has maintained.

Turkey wanted to strengthen its position in northern Syria and avoid a new round of violence in the crisis that may have resulted in a massive influx of refugees.

Turkey is home to more than 3.6 million Syrian refugees, and Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan has stated that his administration will push a million of them to return, despite mounting public outrage.

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